A-Z of Pattern Adaptation

Tap into the spirit of 1930s-1960s experimentation by adapting your own vintage knitting patterns - this ongoing series will help you to de-mystify and bring back to life these gorgeous designs ...

Dec 4

Are you lusting after your own copy of ‘Knit Back In Time’? Or do you know any knitters who might be? Forgive me while I wheel out that old cliché but since Christmas is a time for giving I’ve got two copies of ‘Knit Back In Time’ to give away to two lucky knitters. All you have to do is complete the entry form below to enter and a copy of this indispensable guide to adapting vintage knitting patterns could be yours … the deadline is midnight on Friday 13th December 2013, so get your skates on! This is a UK-based offer only, apologies to overseas folks.

Knit Back In Time is a step by step ‘how-to’ book, and reveals two crucial secrets for knitting vintage-style projects: how to update a vintage pattern to modern sizes and yarns, and how to customise modern patterns to give them a vintage look. It also provides patterns for vintage-style elements such as sleeves, collars and cuffs, and offers invaluable advice on mixing and matching sleeves, necklines and collars to create your own designs.

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Nov 28

One of the many advantages of running workshops in The Needlemakers is that I’m surrounded by vintage and antique specialists. Mark from Revive All was going through this Punch magazine and thought of me when he came across this Shell Chemicals ad – the image of the child knitting with intense concentration on her face is undeniably cute, and reminds me of the six small faces I teach every Wednesday (although to be honest there’s more chat than concentration going on!) But it’s the ad text that caught my attention – it’s a rather nice description of the child learning to knit, but it also tells us something about the evolution of yarn technology of the day.

It reads: “Sooner or later, Susie’s knitting has a habit of acquiring length without breadth, whatever the pattern. Just what it’s going to be at any given moment depends on the leaping imagination of its young creator. Knitted up or unravelled, that wool has been around for a long time. It has suffered in the cause of many a new project, but never has it suffered from moth. Because, like so much that is made of wool these days it is mothproofed with ‘Dielmoth.” (why didn’t they go the whole hog and just call it Diemoth?)  It goes on to invite those in the wool trade to contact Shell for more information.

It’s an interesting piece of marketing for Shell – for one, it stands out in the rather masculine setting of Punch, but it also struck me that knitting was still such a ubiquitous hobby that they’d consider place it smack in the centre of a campaign, happy to associate their advancing technology with yarn as one of its beneficial bi-products.

Although many of us also ‘suffer from moth’, I’m sure wool consumers would prefer to associate their wool with natural products such as happy sheep frolicking on the Shetland hillside rather than the chemical industry!

Nov 7

Managed to take some time off last week, and found ourselves hurtling under the Channel in a nostalgic search for flick-knives and Pelforth in Paris (actually more like a waistband-popping visit to Stohrer topped off by a fine Brouilly nowadays). I wasn’t consciously looking for anything particularly yarn-related (apart from a couple of sneaky visits to La Droguerie and Cat’Laine) … but it found me anyway, nestling amongst a bunch of dead animals. Of course.

Perhaps strangely for an animal lover and ex-vegetarian of 15 years, Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature is one of my favourite museums – apart from the fact that it’s an ideal place to take a tired 7-yr-old with a keen eye for taxidermy, it’s housed in the elegant 17th century Hôtel de Guénégaud, a traditionally Parisian backdrop against which to successfully blend both abstract pagan and rather more modern concepts. Even if the subject matter and room after room of glassy-eyed stuffed animals isn’t your thing, it’s hard not to get carried away by the theatricality of the exhibits and thoughtful display methods (although Jnr was justifiably freaked by the ceiling in the owl room). One of the chief delights is seeking out the wooden curiosity cabinets – which are works of art in themselves – devoted to various wild beasties:  look through a pair of ‘binoculars’ and you’ll get a badger’s view of the forest; open a door and you’ll discover a child’s picture of a wolf accompanied by music; tug on a handle and slide out a 17th century engraving of a stag; pull out a heavy drawer and you’ll find an imprint of the animal’s faeces set into bronze. Hares, foxes, deer, wild boars … the essence of each is captured in these exquisite animal spirit repositories.

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Pattern Sales

Unfortunately I haven't been able to spend so much time on pattern sales recently and the site has suffered as a result, so sadly I've decided not to continue with selling vintage knitting patterns. read more ...

About Me

I've been knitting and crocheting since the age of seven, taught by my mum and nans who instilled in me a love of the patterns they knitted from originally. Over the years I developed a style of my own, adapting these wonderful designs for a modern fit and yarn choice. read more ...

Vintage Tips

If you're new to the vintage knitting pattern game, have a look at these useful tips first - they'll help you decide which wool to use and if the pattern needs adapting ... more

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